The Bros. Landreth

The Bros. Landreth

biography

Twenty-seven years. Four bandmates. Two brothers. One album.

Let It Lie, the debut release from Canadian roots-rockers the Bros. Landreth, is proof that there’s strength in numbers. It’s an album about open highways and broken hearts, anchored by the bluesy wail of electric guitars, the swell of B3 organ, and the harmonized swoon of two voices that were born to mesh. At first listen, you might call it Americana. Dig deeper, though, and you’ll hear the nuances that separate The Bros. Landreth — whose members didn’t grow up in the American south, but rather the isolated prairie city of Winnipeg, Manitoba — from their folksy friends in the Lower 48.

Where does the sound come from? Maybe it’s in their blood. After all, long before they made music together, siblings David and Joey Landreth attended their father’s bar gigs as babies. “Mom would take us in the basinet and stick us under the bar tables, and we’d fall asleep,” says David. “Dad was a working musician who backed up people like Amos Garrett, but his love was always songwriting. He’d play three or four sets at those bars, so we’d be at the gigs all night.”

As the kids got older, they began paying attention to the records their parents would play in the small, WWII-era shack that doubled as the family’s home. Bonnie Raitt, Ry Cooder, and Little Feat all received plenty of airtime, with John Hiatt’s Bring the Family and Lyle Lovett’s Pontiac standing out as family favorites. The siblings absorbed those records, which spun tales of love, life and lust in the Bible Belt. Years later — after Joey and David had given up their gigs as sidemen to form their own group, with drummer Ryan Voth and keyboardist Alex Campbell rounding out the ranks — the Bros. Landreth began drawing on that familiar sound, mixing the rootsy swirl of Americana with the bandmates’ own experiences up north.

Let It Lie was recorded in a straw bale house in southern Manitoba, during one of the coldest winters in recent memory. Working with producer Murray Pulver, the Bros. Landreth found warmth in the songs that Joey and David had written at home, brewing up an earthy, earnest sound that has since drawn comparisons to the Eagles, the Allman Brothers, and Jackson Browne. Eager to tip their hat to the man who gave the Landreth siblings their very first instruments, the band also recorded a version of “I am the Fool,” a song originally written by the boys’ father, renowned Winnipeg musician Wally Landreth. Wally even stopped by the studio to sing a verse on “Runaway Train,” a scuzzy, fuzzy rock song that mixes boogie-woogie guitars with two generations of bluesy, booming Landreth vocals.

That hometown was quick to embrace the Bros. Landreth, with the Winnipeg Free Press applauding the band’s “blues rock [songs] resplendent with soulful harmonies as golden and warm as the late evening sun.” Meanwhile, the band began hitting the road in 2013, traveling the heartlands and highways that helped inspire their songs in the first place. They didn’t limit their focus to Canada, either. During the summer of 2014, the Bros. Landreth signed a deal with Slate Creek Records, an American label whose roster includes singer/songwriter Brandy Clark and Pistol Annies member Angaleena Presley.

news

Joey Landreth Named “Slide’s New Star” By Guitarist Magazine
The Bros. Landreth & Spotify Release New Cover From their Undercover Bros. EP!
The Bros. Landreth Debut Partnership With Spotify!
Watkins Family Hour and The Bros. Landreth Featured as Best Acts of Americana Fest by Rolling Stone
New Frontier Artist to Perform During AMA Week
Cayamo 2016 Announces First Wave of Artists Including Six New Frontier Acts
The Avett Brothers, The Suffers, and The Bros. Landreth Announced to Play LouFest 2015
The Bros. Landreth and Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds Featured By Associated Press
The Bros. Landreth Featured On Pollstar

TOUR DATES

Date City Venue
Feb 26 - Mar 02 Miami, FL Keeping The Blues Alive Cruise

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